Common Conditions

At Performance Physiotherapy we treat the entire body from head to toe. Find below a brief list of just a few of the common conditions that are treated by our highly trained staff.

Achilles Tendonitis

Achilles tendonitis is an inflammation of the tendon joining the calf muscle to the heel. It is common among runners and other repetitive athletes.

Symptoms
Pain in the back of the heel
Stiffness and pain when getting up in the morning
Visible thickening of the tendon

Your physiotherapist will devise a plan that involves various stretching and strengthening exercises along with some other modalities that may include ultrasound, massage and orthotics.

Tennis Elbow

“Tennis elbow” is a common term for lateral epicondylitis. Tennis elbow presents as an inflammation of the muscles and tendons of the forearm that attach the to the outside of the elbow. Tennis elbow most commonly affects people in their dominant arm.

Symptoms
Pain slowly increasing around the outside of the elbow
Pain worsening when shaking hands or squeezing objects
Weakness may be present in the forearm and wrist
Numbness and tingling on the fingers

Treatments
A physical therapy regime designed specifically for you, forearm bracing to rest the tendons and topical anti-inflammatory gels.

Golfer’s Elbow

“Golfer’s elbow” is a common term for medial epicondylitis. Golfer’s elbow presents as an inflammation of the muscles and tendons of the forearm that attach the to the inside of the elbow.

Symptoms
Pain and tenderness on the inside of the elbow.
Stiffness in the elbow, and it may hurt to make a fist.
Weakness may be present in the forearm and wrist.
Numbness and tingling on the fingers

Treatments
A physical therapy regime designed specifically for you, forearm bracing to rest the tendons and topical anti-inflammatory gels.

Post-Operative Knee Replacement Therapy

Having a total knee replacement, you will require physical therapy and rehabilitation following the surgery. You can expect to be involved in physical therapy soon after your surgery, and you may require therapy for a few months following your knee surgery.

Your physiotherapist can work with you to get you comfortable in the beginning using assitive devices such as walkers, crutches and canes.

Your physiotherapist will then work extensively with you to improve range of motion and strength around the new joint. Physiotherapy is also important to control pain and swelling after the surgery.

Post-Operative Hip Replacement Therapy

Having a total hip replacement, you will require physical therapy and rehabilitation following the surgery. You can expect to be involved in physical therapy soon after your surgery, and you may require therapy for a few months following your total knee surgery.

Your physiotherapist can work with you to get you comfortable in the beginning using assitive devices such as walkers, crutches and canes.

Your physiotherapist will then work extensively with you to improve range of motion and strength around the new joint. Physio therapy is also important to control pain and swelling after the surgery.

Post-Operative Knee Ligament Reconstruction Therapy

Following surgery, physiotherapy is critical to ensure a safe and healthy return to previous activity.

Your physiotherapist can work with you to get you comfortable in the beginning using assitive devices such as walkers, crutches and canes and can also fit you for various braces that you will require throughout the rehab process.

Your physiotherapist will then work extensively with you to improve range of motion and strength around the knee and work to reduce swelling and pain with the ultimate goal of returning to normal activity.

Sciatica

Symptoms
Pain in the rear or leg that is worse when sitting
Burning or tingling down the leg
Weakness, numbness, or difficulty moving the leg or foot

Physiotherapy treatment of sciatic nerve varies based on the cause and presentation of each individual patients symptoms.

Depending on the root cause of the presenting sciatica treatment plans will differ but the general idea is to maintain/increase range of motion, decrease muscle tension, reduce pain, and restore strength, stabilization, and function.

Ankle Sprains

An ankle sprain occurs when the ligaments in the ankle are overstretched, usually by a traumatic injury in which the ankle rolls over.

Symptoms
Swelling
Bruising
Pain when weight bearing

The focus of physiotherapy is to reduce swelling, maintain proper range of motion and strengthen the surrounding muscles to reduce the risk of re-injuring the joint in the future.

Hamstring Strain/Tear

Hamstring injuries are both common and painful. Hamstring strains are most commonly seen among athletes involved in sports that involve running, jumping and sudden movements.

Symptoms
Sudden and severe pain during exercise, along with a snapping or popping feeling
Pain in the back of the thigh and lower buttock when walking, straightening the leg, or bending over
Bruising

A treatment plan will be devised by your physiotherapist that will include ice/heat in conjunction with various stretching and strengthening exercises.

Plantar Fasciitis

Symptoms
Heel pain on weight-bearing
Pain first thing in the morning
Arch pain

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common foot ailments. It is strain and inflammation of the soft tissue on the bottom of the foot. It is typically characterized by heel pain that is worse in the morning. Plantar fasciitis is treated using corrective orthotics, proper footwear and physical therapy.

Whiplash

When the head and neck are suddenly and forcefully whipped forward and back, mechanical forces place excessive stress on the cervical spine. Soft tissue around the joints can become injured resulting in mild to severe neck pain.

Symptoms
Neck pain or neck pain that travels down the arm
Headaches
Low back pain
Jaw pain
Dizziness

Physiotherapy will work improve your neck range of motion and strength. Healthy body alignment and posture will also be encouraged along with other conservative care that may include immobilization and massage.

Carpal Tunnel

Carpal tunnel syndrome occurs when the median nerve, which runs from the forearm into the palm of the hand, becomes compressed or squeezed at the wrist. This nerve passes through a tunnel and swelling and thickening of the tendons that make up this tunnel can cause the nerve to be impinged.

Symptoms
Numbness and pain in the hand and forearm that worsens as activity increases
Night pain the hand
Stiffness in the fingers upon waking in the morning

Physiotherapy treatment can be used to decrease swelling in and around the carpel tunnel to reduce the symptom inducing pressure on the median nerve.